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Amid the usual noisy demonstrations from anti-globalisation protesters, the annual G8 summit met in Heiligendamm, northern Germany. Thanks to American opposition (and a new proposal for negotiations that George Bush unveiled last week), the summit looked unlikely to reach agreement on climate change, which its host Angela Merkel had put top of the agenda.

The pre-summit atmosphere was soured by Russia's president, Vladimir Putin. He threatened to retaliate against the deployment of limited American missile defences in Poland and the Czech Republic by targeting Russia's nuclear missiles on Europe again.

Rumours that Turkey had invaded northern Iraq in force were denied. But Turkish troops and armour continued to mass on the border. Senior figures in both the army and the government favour a cross-border operation in pursuit of Kurdish PKK fighters. See article

The Basque separatist group ETA formally ended the ceasefire that it had declared in March 2006. The announcement was a blow to the Spanish prime minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, who had stuck his neck out to negotiate with ETA. He faces a general election next March. See article

The European Union decided to recommence talks with Serbia on a stabilisation agreement, the usual prelude to membership talks, which had been suspended last year because of Serbia's failure to hand over the Bosnian Serb wartime general, Ratko Mladic, to the war-crimes tribunal at The Hague. Some diplomats expect Serbia to catch Mr Mladic soon. See article



War weary
Israel held training exercises for a possible clash with Syria as Ehud Olmert, the prime minister, tried to dampen fears at home of a war this summer. But, in a change from previous statements, he said Israel would like to hold direct talks with Syria.

France argued for an aid corridor from Chad into Sudan's war-torn Darfur region to help the relief operation there. France is the only Western country with troops already in Chad that could protect such a channel.

A joint report by two UN agencies, the Food and Agriculture Organisation and the World Food Programme, said that 2.1m Zimbabweans may be dangerously short of food by the third quarter of this year. That figure may rise to more than 4m (a third of all Zimbabweans) in the first three months of next year.

The trial of Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, began in The Hague. He has been indicted on 11 charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his alleged role in a civil war in Sierra Leone; the trial could last for up to 18 months

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