June 10th, 2020

seattle

(no subject)

...And history can unfold in unpredictable ways. Who would have guessed 20 years ago, he asks, that the First Amendment’s free-speech guarantee would become passé on the liberal left? “I used to get a laugh from students by quoting a Soviet citizen I talked to once. He said to me, ‘Of course we have freedom of speech. We just don’t allow people to lie.’ That used to get a laugh! They don’t laugh anymore.”

https://www.wsj.com/articles/violent-protest-and-the-intelligentsia-11591400422
seattle

(no subject)

И хотя аллюзии Сола Морсона https://www.wsj.com/articles/violent-protest-and-the-intelligentsia-11591400422 на предреволюционную Россию определенно заслуживают внимания, все же необходимо помнить о той драматической разнице, которая очевидно существует между американским общественным укладом и укладом российской жизни. И не только в предреволюционную эпоху. Недооценка этой разницы Солом Морсоном хорошо видна из определения понятия интеллигенции, которое он использует:

«The word “intelligentsia,” he notes, comes from Russian. In the classic period, from about 1860 to the First Russian Revolution in 1905, “the word did not mean everybody who was educated. It meant educated people who identified with one or another of the radical movements. ‘Intelligents’ believed in atheism, revolution and either socialism or anarchism.»

Однобокость определения тем более странна, что Морсон обладает несомненным знанием русской культуры и истории.